Research Pipeline

The CDCN’s Ground-breaking Collaborative Network Approach: an 8-step approach to accelerating research

Build Community

Since it was first established in 2012, the CDCN has connected the global community of physicians, researchers, patients and loved ones to accelerate CD research, treatment, and patient care. The CDCN started by contacting all of the authors from the 2,000+ papers on PubMed associated with Castleman disease. Then, the CDCN held its first in-person meeting of physicians and researchers at ASH 2012 and webinars to connect the various members of the community. Next, the CDCN established an online forum for patients to connect with one another and an online forum for physicians and researchers to connect with one another. More recently, a database of the top physicians around the world was created to refer patients to them. This community is always growing, but today, it includes:

  • A Scientific Advisory Board of 32 experts from eight countries on five continents
  • 500+ physicians and researchers 
  • Over 10,000 patients and loved ones that have been connected through our online portal
  • Patients are engaged on the Scientific Advisory Board, Leadership Team and research meetings, and supported through a Patient Summitonline discussion board, physician referrals, and educational materials.

Crowdsource and Study Prioritization

The traditional way that rare disease research is performed is random, and it can be redundant and slow. Typically, research organizations raise funds, invite researchers to submit applications to use the funds how the researchers see fit, and the research organizations select the best applications to fund. One must hope that the right researcher with the right skill set submits an application with the right idea to perform the right project at the right time. The potential possibilities for what studies will be performed are limited to ideas generated by individuals who can actually perform the studies.

The CDCN takes a radically different approach. It leverages the Community (Step 1) of physicians, researchers, and patients to generate ideas for what studies should be done by using online questionnaires, a crowdsourcing platform (Codigital), social media data, and email submissions. Then, the CDCN Scientific Advisory Board prioritizes these crowdsourced ideas into an "International Research Agenda." Patients are at the heart of everything the CDCN does - by engaging patients on various platforms like the leadership team and online discussion board, the CDCN ensures the research priorities will answer questions most important to patients.

This approach means that we don't just hope that the right study will be conceptualized and applied for by a researcher. We identify the right study and then recruit the right researcher (Step 3) with the right skill set to perform the study and provide the necessary funding and tissue samples. Most importantly, any idea can potentially turn into a study rather than just ideas conceived by the researchers that can perform the studies.

Identify researchers

With the right studies identified and prioritized (Step 2) on the CDCN's "International Research Agenda" (IRA, studies listed below), the CDCN actively recruits and engages the leading expert for a particular kind of study to conduct the high-priority project that the CDCN needs performed. If you are a physician/researcher interested in getting involved, please join the network here.

Fundraising

With the right study identified and prioritized (Step 2) and the top researcher in the world recruited (Step 3), the CDCN performs targeted fundraising to enable the specific studies. The CDCN maximizes every dollar contributed by maintaining very low operating costs, promoting collaboration among researchers rather than duplication, and strategically funding high-impact research initiatives.

Funds are raised through four main channels:

  1. Events and campaigns (Quest for a Cure Gala!)
  2. Individual donations (donate here!)
  3. The Castleman Warrior Program - The Warrior program was established to connect patients and loved ones around the world. This very dedicated group of patients and loved ones fight back against CD by raising money and awareness for research. Get involved here!
  4. Collaborative partnerships with corporations and foundations

Sample Procurement/Patient Enrollment

For every study, the CDCN works with patients and physicians around the world to coordinate obtaining the necessary samples (e.g., blood, saliva, left over lymph node tissue, etc). Obtaining high-quality samples is a major challenge in rare disease research.

The CDCN proactively seeks to obtain tissue samples for future studies, because researchers can't do research without patient samples. The CDCN's international community of researchers needs samples from Castleman disease patients so that we can continue to drive forward our search for a cure!  These samples help us to better characterize this disease and will lead to greater knowledge about current and potential treatments. If you would like to donate a sample, please click here

Study Execution

After selecting the top priority project (Step 2), recruiting the foremost expert in that field (Step 3), and obtaining the necessary funds (Step 4) and samples (Step 5), the CDCN assists with all aspects of successful execution of the study. We establish a research agreement, coordinate contracts among collaborators, provide project management support, and contribute scientific advice throughout the process. 

Data analysis and search for new treatments based on results

After the data is generated from the study, the CDCN works with collaborators to ensure rapid analysis of the data. Together with the researcher and input from members of the CDCN research community, a paper is generated for a peer-reviewed journal that features the results of the study. Using results from research studies, the CDCN aims to identify existing drugs that may be effective against Castleman disease. Results from the use of these existing treatments are captured in the ACCELERATE Registry. The CDCN also advances clinical trials of promising drugs based on these studies.

Disseminate Knowledge

After performing the studies and publishing the data, the CDCN works to ensure these findings are disseminated among researchers, physicians, patients and loved ones around the world as quickly as possible. We accomplish this through physician/researcher meetings, Patient Summits, online portals for patients, physicians and researchers, social media and online CDCN resources. 

When battling a rare disease, it is essential new findings are shared with a wide audience as quickly as possible.

Then, the CDCN shares these results with the Community (Step 1) to inspire new ideas for research (Step 2) and the cycle repeats.

1) What causes Castleman disease? What is the cause of the immune system hyperactivation?

HUNT (Hunting for an Unknown, Novel Trigger) I

Study E-100

Cost $57,000

Status Funded

Samples have been collected and the study has been performed. Data is currently being analyzed.

Description

We need to understand why the immune system becomes activated in Castleman disease. One hypothesis (idea) about the cause is that a virus or another pathogen triggers the immune system (the body’s defense system against infections) to become activated. The activated immune system releases inflammatory proteins that can cause flu-like symptoms and organ failure. The HUNT study looks at Castleman disease patients’ lymph node samples to “hunt” for the RNA (like a fingerprint) of pathogens. If a virus is causing Castleman disease, we’ll find it. This is also called “viral hunting” or “pathogen discovery".

Investigators

Dr. Ian Lipkin (PI, Columbia University); co-Investigators: Drs. David Fajgenbaum (UPenn), Jason Ruth (Harvard), & Chris Nabel (Harvard)
See Map of Collaborators

Castleman Genome Project

Study E-200

Cost $63,000

Status Funded

$28,000 from Castleman Disease Collaborative Network and the Wharton Class of 2015 and $35,000 from the Penn Orphan Disease Center. Samples have been collected and the study has been performed. Data is currently being analyzed.

Description

We need to understand why the immune system becomes activated in Castleman disease. One hypothesis (idea) is that Castleman disease patients may have a genetic defect that causes the immune system to be uncontrolled and to not turn off. A genome is the complete set of DNA (genetic material) that contains all the information for a person to develop and grow. This study looks at the complete set of genetic material of 14 patients to see if there is a common genetic defect among patients with Castleman disease. This is also called "Whole Genome Sequencing."

Investigators

Dr. Minji Byun (PI, Washington University in St. Louis); collaborators: Drs. David Fajgenbaum (UPenn) & Jason Ruth (Harvard)

FAST (Flow cytometry And Studies of T-cells) I, FAST II, & FAST III

Study E-201

Cost $110,000

Status Funded

Collecting samples and conducting the study. Patients: let us know if you're interested in contributing samples!

Description

Defects in a gene, which are called mutations, may cause the gene to no longer function correctly. For example, a mutation in a gene that controls the immune system could cause the immune system to become uncontrollable. These gene mutations may be passed along in families from generation to generation. This study will help us find out if there is a common change in an inflammatory gene among patients with Castleman disease and will help us know if this is a genetic disease. It will also investigate the role of a key immune cell called a T-cell.

Investigators

Drs. David Fajgenbaum (co-PI, UPenn) and Taku Kambayashi (co-PI, UPenn)

Somatic Mutation Search

Study E-300

Cost $40,000

Status Funded

Funded through the Penn Orphan Disease Center and the 2016 Quest for a Cure event. Currently searching for patient samples!

Description

We need to understand why the immune system becomes activated in Castleman disease. One hypothesis (idea) is that Castleman disease is caused by cancer cells. Cancer cells are just normal cells which have acquired mutations (changes in their DNA) over the course of life. These mutations are called somatic mutations. This study looks for cancer cells in patients' lymph nodes and will help us find out if cancer cells with somatic mutations cause Castleman disease. The techniques used in this study will be "Whole Genome Sequencing" or "Whole Exome Sequencing."

Investigators

Drs. Kojo Elenitoba-Johnson (PI, UPenn), Megan Lim (co-I, UPenn), & David Fajgenbaum (co-I, UPenn)

Autoantibodies in Castleman disease

Study E-400

Cost ~$100,000

Status Not Funded

Need funding and an investigator with international eminence for identifying auto-antibodies

Description

We need to understand why the immune system becomes activated in Castleman disease. Antibodies are secreted by immune cells to fight infection. Sometimes those antibodies attack healthy cells in the body and are called auto-antibodies. One hypothesis is that auto-antibodies are responsible for activating the immune system in patients with Castleman disease. Previous studies have shown that at least 20% of Castleman disease patients have auto-antibodies in their blood. This study will look for auto-antibodies in the blood of patients to see if they are causing the immune system to attack healthy cells. 

Investigators

To be determined! Please reach out to Dustin@castlemannetwork.org if you are interested in learning more about this study. 

2) What type of immune cells are activated?

Unlock the Cell I

Study C-100

Cost $25,000

Status Funded

Sponsored by Castleman Warriors and the University of Pennsylvania Hematologic Malignancies Bank. Currently searching for patient samples!

Description

In Castleman disease, the immune system becomes activated and releases inflammatory proteins called cytokines. These cytokines cause vital organs (liver, kidneys, bone marrow) to not work well and to shut down. We don't know which immune cells or pathways are activated. This study looks for the activated immune cells and cellular pathways. Researchers will examine Castleman Disease lymph nodes using immunohistochemistry, a process that causes certain cellular markers to light up. A process called flow cytometry will help determine the active cell types and the cell pathways.

Investigators

Dr. Vera Krymskaya (co-PI, UPenn); Dr. David Fajgenbaum (co-PI, UPenn); Dr. Evgeniy Eruslanov (co-PI, UPenn)

Unlock the Cell II

Study C-101

Cost $20,000

Status Funded

Sponsored by Castleman Warriors. Currently searching for patient samples!

Description

In Castleman disease, the immune system becomes activated and releases inflammatory proteins called cytokines. These cytokines cause vital organs (liver, kidneys, bone marrow) to not work well and to shut down. We don't know which immune cells or pathways are activated. This study looks for the activated immune cells and cellular pathways by combining flow cytometry data from multiple research institutions.

Investigators

Dr. David Fajgenbaum (co-PI, UPenn); Dr. Frits van Rhee (co-PI, UPenn)

PACE-LN (Pathology Analysis for Castleman Cell Type and Etiology-Lymph Node)

Study C-200

Cost $20,000

Status Funded

Description

In Castleman disease, the immune system becomes activated and releases inflammatory proteins called cytokines. These cytokines cause vital organs (liver, kidneys, bone marrow) to not work well and to shut down. We don't know which immune cells or pathways are activated. This study looks for the activated immune cells and cellular pathways in the lymph node. Researchers will examine Castleman Disease lymph nodes using immunohistochemistry, a process that causes certain cellular markers to light up. We will also apply machine learning algorithms to identify patterns within the samples and across patients.

Investigators

Dr. David Fajgenbaum (PI, UPenn)

PACE-BM (Pathology Analysis for Castleman Cell Type and Etiology-Bone Marrow)

Study C-201

Cost $20,000

Status Funded

Description

In Castleman disease, the immune system becomes activated and releases inflammatory proteins called cytokines. These cytokines cause vital organs (liver, kidneys, bone marrow) to not work well and to shut down. We don't know which immune cells or pathways are activated. This study looks for the activated immune cells and cellular pathways in the bone marrow. Researchers will examine Castleman Disease bone marrow using immunohistochemistry, a process that causes certain cellular markers to light up. We will also apply machine learning algorithms to identify patterns within the samples and across patients.

Investigators

Drs. Megan Lim (co-PI, UPenn), Dale Frank (co-PI, UPenn), David Fajgenbaum (co-PI, UPenn)

3) What pathways in the immune cells are activated?

RACE (RNA sequencing Analysis of Castleman’s Etiology)

Study P-100

Cost $57,000

Status Funded

Currently searching for patient samples.

Description

In Castleman disease, the immune system becomes activated and releases inflammatory proteins called cytokines. These cytokines cause vital organs (liver, kidneys, bone marrow) to not work well and to shut down. We don't know which immune cells or pathways are activated. This study looks for the pathways that are activated in the cells of lymph node samples by telling us which genes are turned on. This technique is called RNA sequencing. Samples will be used from Study E-300.

Investigators

Drs. Elenitoba-Johnson (PI, UPenn), Megan Lim (co-I, UPenn), & David Fajgenbaum (co-PI, UPenn)

HUNT II/RACE II

Study P-101

Cost $75,000

Status Funded

Currently searching for patient samples.

Description

In Castleman disease, the immune system becomes activated and releases inflammatory proteins called cytokines. These cytokines cause vital organs (liver, kidneys, bone marrow) to not work well and to shut down. We don't know which immune cells or pathways are activated. This study looks for the pathways that are activated in the cells of lymph node samples by telling us which genes are turned on. This technique is called RNA sequencing. Samples will be used from Study P-100.

Investigators

Drs. David Fajgenbaum (co-PI, UPenn), Jason Ruth (co-PI, Harvard), Chris Nabel (co-PI, Harvard), and Ian Lipkin (Columbia)

See Map of Collaborators

Investigation of mTOR in Castleman disease

Study P-200

Cost $125,000

Status Funded

Sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania Research Foundation & Penn Center for Precision Medicine

Description

In Castleman disease, the immune system becomes activated and releases inflammatory proteins called cytokines. These cytokines cause vital organs (liver, kidneys, bone marrow) to not work well and to shut down. We don't know which immune cells or pathways are activated. The CDCN recently discovered that an important communication line in the immune system called the mTOR pathway was activated in a few patients. This study investigates the mTOR pathway in more patients via immunohistochemistry, a process that causes certain cellular markers to light up, and flow cytometry.

Investigators

Drs. David Fajgenbaum (PI, UPenn) & Taku Kambayashi (co-I, UPenn)

Next-Generation Cellular and Molecular Study of TAFRO Syndrome

Study P-300

Cost ~$100,000

Status Not Funded

Need funding and patient samples

Description

In Castleman disease, the immune system becomes activated and releases inflammatory proteins called cytokines. These cytokines cause vital organs (liver, kidneys, bone marrow) to not work well and to shut down. We don't know which immune cells or pathways are activated. This study looks for the activated immune cells and cellular pathways. Researchers will examine Castleman Disease lymph nodes using multiple cutting-edge technologies, such as TCRb sequencing, BCR sequencing, flow cytometry, Whole Exome Sequencing, CyTOF, MIBI, CODEX, and/or single-cell RNASeq. These new technologies will investigate dozens and hundreds of markers to help determine the active cell types and the cell pathways.

4) What factors are released by the activated immune cells?

SPEED (Serum Proteomics Evaluation for Etio-pathogenesis Data) I

Study S-100

Cost $23,000

Status Funded

Sponsored by The Jayanthan Family & Friends. Data collected, currently analyzing.

Description

In Castleman disease, the immune system becomes activated and releases inflammatory proteins called cytokines. These cytokines cause vital organs (liver, kidneys, bone marrow) to not work well and to shut down. We know a few of these cytokines that play an important role, but no one has ever measured a large number of them. In this study, we measure 1129 proteins from 7 patients during a disease flare and during remission to find out which proteins play a role in Castleman disease.

Investigators

Drs. David Fajgenbaum (co-PI, UPenn), Ruth (co-PI, Harvard), & van Rhee (co-PI, UAMS); Somalogic, MyriadRBM

SPEED II

Study S-200

Cost $350,000, sponsored by Janssen Pharmaceuticals; all legal costs provided pro bono by Dechert, LLC

Status Funded

Analyzing data.

Description

In Castleman disease, the immune system becomes activated and releases inflammatory proteins called cytokines. These cytokines cause vital organs (liver, kidneys, bone marrow) to not work well and to shut down. We know a few of these cytokines that play an important role, but no one has ever measured a large number of them. In this study, we will measure 1300 proteins in the blood of 80 Castleman disease patients at various time points as well as patients with other diseases that exhibit similar features to Castleman disease (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, HHV8-positive MCD, Hodgkin's Lymphoma). Seven institutions from around the world contributed samples. Identifying these proteins released in Castleman disease is important.  If we know which proteins are involved, we can use treatments to target those particular proteins. Also, identifying proteins involved can provide us with new ways to diagnose Castleman disease.

Investigators

Drs. David Fajgenbaum (co-PI, UPenn) & Jason Ruth (co-PI, Harvard); Platform: Somalogic

See Map of Collaborators 

5) What existing and new treatments are most effective for patients with Castleman disease?

Systematic Literature Review of Castleman Disease Treatments and Clinical Data

Study T-100

Cost $2,500

Status Funded

Published!

Description

There are many different treatments that have been used in Castleman disease patients, but no one has ever tracked what works and what does not work. We need to know more about which types of treatments work and in which types of people. This study, called a systematic literature review, looked at how well treatments work in different types of people.  This study also looked at how Castleman disease starts and progresses over time in patients. In this study, the authors also collected clinical data from Castleman disease patients around the world.

The key findings included: one-third to one-half of MCD cases are HHV-8-negative, 2) commonly observed features of iMCD are lymphadenopathy, anemia, elevated CRP, hypergammaglobulinemia, hypoalbuminemia, elevated IL6, enlarged liver and/or spleen, fever, fluid accumulation, elevated sIL2R, and elevated VEGF, 3) a variety of treatments (corticosteroids, cytotoxic chemotherapy, anti-IL-6 therapy, immunomodulatory) are used with variable effectiveness, and 4) iMCD patients have a 3-fold increased rate of cancer than age-matched controls. These results were published in a top hematology journal, Lancet Haematology. Click here for the article.

Investigators

Drs. David Fajgenbaum (PI, UPenn), Frits van Rhee (co-I, UAMS), Chris Nabel (co-I, Harvard)

ACCELERATE Global Patient Registry

Study T-200

Cost $4,780,000

Status Funded

Launched in October 2016. Enrolling patients now! ACCELERATE is funded through a collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania (sponsor) and Janssen Pharmaceuticals. Funded until 2021.

Description

There are many different treatments that have been used in Castleman disease patients, but no one has ever tracked what works and what does not work. We need to know more about which types of treatments work and in which types of people. This study, called a natural history study, looks at how well treatments work in different types of people.  This study also looks at how Castleman disease starts and progresses over time in patients. In this study, the CDCN will collect clinical data from Castleman disease patients around the world. More information at: www.cdcn.org/accelerate

Investigators

Dr. David Fajgenbaum (PI, UPenn)


See press release here.

Clinical Trial of Sirolimus for iMCD Patients who do not Respond to Siltuximab

Study T-300

Cost $1,500,000

Status Not Funded

Need funding to perform this important clinical trial

Description

The CDCN has identified a treatment that may be effective for HHV-8-negative/idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease (iMCD) patients who do not respond to the only FDA-approved treatment, siltuximab. Sirolimus inhibits four aspects of iMCD that the CDCN has identified: T cell activation, B cell activation, VEGF production, and mTOR activation.

Investigators

Dr. David Fajgenbaum (PI, UPenn)

In-depth Analyses of Clinical Trial Data

Study T-400

Cost a40,000 - Tony Ressler provided a generous gift that enabled this study and a portion of another study

Status Funded

Analyzing data

Description

Siltuximab is the only FDA-approved treatment for HHV-8-negative/idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease (iMCD). Approximately one-third to one-half of iMCD patients do not respond to treatment with siltuximab. A 2017-2018 Ressler Innovation Fellow has been chosen by the CDCN to perform in-depth analyses of available clinical trial data to identify characteristics that may predict why someone may respond or not. Then, we will perform in-depth analyses of the patients who do not respond to siltuximab to guide development and identification of new treatments.

Investigators

Dr. David Fajgenbaum (PI, UPenn)

International Treatment Guidelines

Study T-500

Cost $20,000

Status Not Funded

Description

There are many different treatments that have been used in Castleman disease patients, but there are no guidelines on what should be tried first, second, third, etc and the specific sub-types that require specific treatments. A group of international experts will review the existing published data and then make recommendations regarding which types of treatments work and in which types of people.

Investigators

Drs. Frits van Rhee (co-PI, UAMS), David Fajgenbaum (co-PI, UPenn), and the CDCN Scientific Advisory Board

6) What infrastructure is needed to accelerate research?

Establish Unified Terminology System and Model of Pathogenesis for Castleman Disease

Study I-100

Cost $0

Status Funded

Complete! Research was performed by David Fajgenbaum while in medical school. Results published!

Description

When the CDCN was established in 2012, the first priority was to perform a systematic literature review of all published research on Castleman disease (CD). The results from review of over 2,000 papers were synthesized into the following key findings: 1) CD should be subdivided into unicentric CD, HHV-8-associated multicentric CD, and HHV-8-negative/idiopathic multicentric CD (iMCD), 2) CD should be thought of, researched, and treated less like a cancer and more like a disoder of the immune system, and 3) there are three potential hypotheses that could explain why the immune system becomes hyperactivated in iMCD that require further investigation. These results were published in the top hematology journal in the world, Blood. Click here for the article.

Investigators

Dr. David Fajgenbaum (PI, UPenn) and CDCN Scientific Advisory Board  

Establish a Unique ICD-10 Code for Castleman Disease

Study I-101

Cost $0

Status Funded

Complete. ICD-10 code created! Research that supported this project came from I-100.

Description

When the CDCN was established in 2012, there was not a unique code in the US health care system for Castleman disease. The code for Castleman disease also included any other cause of enlarged lymph nodes. Therefore, patients with CD often had their treatments denied by insurers who didn't realize they had CD and research could not be done to identify patients with CD around the US. The CDCN put together an application and advocated for a unique code in 2014. In October 2016, CD received a unique code: D47.Z2

Investigators

Drs. David Fajgenbaum (co-PI, UPenn), Frits van Rhee (co-PI, UAMS), and CDCN Scientific Advisory Board 

CastleBank (Castleman disease biobank)

Study I-200

Cost $100,000 per year

Status Not Funded

Project funded for 2016. Need funding for 2017-2018.

Description

Studying Castleman disease is difficult because it is difficult to get samples of blood, saliva, and lymph nodes for research. Samples may be stored in various places all over the world with no way of other researchers being able to obtain them. In order to find out what causes Castleman disease, researchers need access to these samples so they can study them. The CastleBank will provide a central location for all samples. Researchers studying Castleman disease will then have access to these samples, making it much easier to study the disease.

Investigators

Dr. David Fajgenbaum (PI, UPenn) and CDCN Scientific Advisory Board 

7) How do you diagnose Castleman disease?

First-Ever International Diagnostic Criteria

Study D-100

Cost $34,000

Status Funded

$17,000 from CDCN, $17,000 from University of Pennsylvania Orphan Disease Center. Complete. Results published!

Description

Diagnosing Castleman disease can be very challenging because there is not an established diagnostic criteria for physicians to check. Diagnostic criteria provide a consistent standard that doctors can use based on signs, symptoms, and laboratory findings of the disease to make a diagnosis. Having diagnostic criteria make diagnosing the disease easier. The CDCN co-hosted a meeting with the Penn Orphan Disease Center (ODC) to establish an international diagnostic criteria. 

Investigators

Dr. David Fajgenbaum (UPenn) and CDCN Scientific Advisory Board

Click here for the article. Click here to utilize the CDCN's Diagnostic Calculator created based on the Diagnostic Criteria!

Validation Study of International Diagnostic Criteria

Study D-101

Cost $5,000

Status Funded

Description

Diagnosing Castleman disease can be very challenging because there is not an established diagnostic criteria for physicians to check. Diagnostic criteria provide a consistent standard that doctors can use based on signs, symptoms, and laboratory findings of the disease to make a diagnosis. Having diagnostic criteria make diagnosing the disease easier. This study involves investigating the new diagnostic criteria to see if it is effective and useful for diagnosing patients.

Investigators

Dr. David Fajgenbaum (UPenn) and CDCN Scientific Advisory Board

Click here for the diagnostic criteria. Click here to utilize the CDCN's Diagnostic Calculator created based on the Diagnostic Criteria!

Disease Activity Score

Study D-200

Cost $10,000

Status Not Funded

Description

After Castleman disease is diagnosed, it is important to know the status of the patient's disease. Disease activity scores provide a consistent standard that doctors can use based on signs, symptoms, and laboratory findings of the disease to track disease status. 

Investigators

Dr. David Fajgenbaum (UPenn) and CDCN Scientific Advisory Board

8) How can physicians, researchers, and patients contribute to finding the answers to these questions?

Physicians: we need physicians to conduct clinical research, help with identifying and prioritizing patient-focused research projects, contribute patient samples to research, and give patients the opportunity to contribute data and samples for research. Email info@castlemannetwork.org for more information about contributing in the above ways.
Researchers: we need researchers to conduct basic, translational, and clinical research and help with identifying and prioritizing high-impact research projects. Email info@castlemannetwork.org for more information about contributing in the above ways.
Patients: we need patients to help with identifying and prioritizing patient-focused research projects, contribute samples and data to research, and help with raising the funds to conduct these high-impact, patient-focused studies. Click here for more information. Email info@castlemannetwork.org for more information about contributing in the above ways.
 

Among several other projects, the CDCN is currently working on the following non-research priorities:

9) How can the CDCN's innovative approach be spread to other diseases to serve as a blueprint for how to cure diseases?

The CDCN has made ground breaking progress in a very short period of time. The CDCN's innovative approach has been written up in The Lancet Haematology. You can read about the approach here.